You find clever ways of saying nothing.

—Euripides’ The Bacchae  (via ambroses)

(Source: pleasingthings, via psychodelicate-girl)

Javier Navarrete

"Pan's Labyrinth Lullaby"

01030104:

Javier Navarrete — Lullaby (Pan’s Labyrinth OST)

(Source: thesoundtrackcollection, via androyd5)

ryanpanos:

Exobiotanica | Makoto Azuma | Via

Tokyo based artist Makoto Azuma, for his latest project titled “Exobiotanica”, teamed with Sacramento-based JP Aerospace - a volunteer-based organization that constructs and sends vessels into orbit, to launch a Japanese white pine bonsai and an arrangement of flowers into the stratosphere. Using Styrofoam and a very light metal frame, the team created two devices to attach the 50-year-old bonsai and the flowers, which were then launch separately using Helium balloons. Azuma attached still cameras and six Go Pro video cameras tied in a ball to record the trip into the stratosphere.

”I wanted to see the movement and beauty of plants and flowers suspended in space,” Azuma later explained T Magazine. After both pieces went up, Azuma embraced his team warmly and smiled. “I always wanted to travel to space,” he said. “This is a dream come true.”

(via praxistential)

Crosby, Stills & Nash

"Wooden Ships"

hallchristopher:

Wooden Ships - Crosby, Stills & Nash

(via androyd5)

krst

Rosencrantz: Do you think Death could possibly be a boat?

Guildenstern: No, no, no… Death is “not.” Death isn’t. Take my meaning? Death is the ultimate negative. Not-being. You can’t not be on a boat.

Rosencrantz: I’ve frequently not been on boats.

Guildenstern: No, no… What you’ve been is not on boats.

—Tom Stoppard, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead (via elucipher)

(Source: imestizaa, via anamorpheus)

baby's first words

baby: d-d-da..
father: daddy?
baby: dada /ˈdɑːdɑː/ or Dadaism was an art movement of the European avant-garde in the early 20th century. Many claim Dada began in Zurich, Switzerland in 1916, spreading to Berlin shortly thereafter but the height of New York Dada was the year before, in 1915.[1] To quote Dona Budd's The Language of Art Knowledge,

opalavocado:

Favourite art piece of the moment; Keith Edmier’s ‘Beverly Edmier 1967’, 1998.

(Source: wombflowers, via ninaeff)


"I’m really a freak in every place I go. I don’t quite fit in the independent scene, I don’t quite fit in the art scene, and I don’t fit in the Hollywood scene, so I’m a weird strange fat motherfucker. I’ll tell you this: I plan to stay that way, because there is something to be said."

"I’m really a freak in every place I go. I don’t quite fit in the independent scene, I don’t quite fit in the art scene, and I don’t fit in the Hollywood scene, so I’m a weird strange fat motherfucker. I’ll tell you this: I plan to stay that way, because there is something to be said."

(Source: queentaraknowles, via deadtastebuds)

plagueofgripes:

asylum-art:

Berlinde De Bruyckere.:Suffering and Protection
Flemish sculptor creates sculptures and drawings of suffering human bodies that resemble nothing so much as reality. It mixes in his sculptures on religious grounds and media images and writes the Christian motif of the human suffering in the contemporary era. The confrontation with the body that engages the artist led to questions about the ethics of our society and are the place to fundamental questions about the nature of the human being.
These disturbing and uncannily lifelike sculptures by Belgian artist Berlinde De Bruyckere are incredibly visceral and eerie. The repulsion instinctively triggered in the viewer comes from their verisimilitude, and the sense of reality of this nameless, grotesque, distorted, half-human, seemingly fluid flesh; combined with their beauty, the delicate, subtle mottling of colors, the pure realistic visceral fleshiness of the works, and their technical grace.

Neat.

(via blepharoptosis)

period by KRUNK Interactive